Former Bangladesh cricket captain Mashrafe Mortaza and two other players said they have tested positive for the coronavirus as infections in the South Asian nation rise.

Left-arm spinner Nazmul Islam and former opener Nafees Iqbal were the other two who revealed their positive test results.

Mashrafe, who stepped down as the one-day international captain in March but remains available for selection, announced the news on social media late Saturday.

“Today my Covid-19 results came as positive. Everyone please pray for my quick recovery,” Mashrafe wrote on Facebook.

“The number of infected people has now crossed one lakh (100,000). We all have to become more careful. Let’s all stay at home, and not get out unless it is necessary. I am abiding by the protocol at home.”

Mashrafe — also a member of parliament — had been active in helping people during the pandemic, particularly in his hometown and constituency Narail west of the capital Dhaka.

His mother-in-law and another relative tested positive last week, a Narail health official said.

Nafees, the elder brother of Bangladesh opener Tamim Iqbal, played 11 Tests and 16 one-day internationals for his country and is currently a domestic cricket coach.

“Ten days ago I was feeling feverish. For two days my body temperature was high. I lost my appetite, felt very weak,” Nafees said in an audio message emailed to reporters on Saturday.

“Then I gave sample for the test and the result came that I am COVID-19 positive.”

Left arm spinner Nazmul, who took part in virus aid work in his hometown of Narayanganj, said he received his results on Saturday.

“I don’t know how I got it. My parents also tested positive along with me,” the 28-year-old, who played one Test, five ODIs and 13 Twenty20 internationals for Bangladesh, told AFP Sunday.

Bangladesh has confirmed over 108,000 infections and more than 1,400 deaths from the coronavirus so far.

The impoverished country has restarted economic activities after lifting a months-long virus lockdown at the end of May even as cases continue to rise.